Wikimedia

  1. Why I periodically write about the elements on Wikipedia

    Elements are the building blocks that, when combined, constitute the full diversity of chemistry. That’s why I write about them on Wikipedia.... Read more

  2. Community digest: New tool eases reuse of Creative Commons-licensed photos, news in brief

    Wikimedia Germany has created a new tool that will help re-users of Wikimedia Commons content comply with the requirements of Creative Commons’ free licenses. In addition, this week’s news in brief includes updates about the Wikipedia Education program, GLAM wiki, Women’s history month editathons, and more.... Read more

  3. Wizards, Muggles and Wikidata: The Room of Requirement for structured knowledge

    As Wikidata compiles structured knowledge about the world, it needs contributors from all backgrounds, wizards and muggles alike.... Read more

  4. How a feminist stood up to trolls and measurably changed Wikipedia’s coverage of women scientists

    Did the efforts of Emily Temple-Wood (“Keilana”) and other editors really make a difference in Wikipedia’s coverage of women scientists—especially given the vast expanse of an encyclopedia that has 5.4 million articles in English alone? The answer, one year after the headlines, is an unequivocal yes.... Read more

  5. The road not taken: Why I write about horses on Wikipedia

    The “horse bug,” however contracted, is incurable and lifelong. It might even be genetic: my father, my grandfather, and my great-grandfather all worked with horses. In any case, I have it. And that is why I write Wikipedia articles about horses. ... Read more

  6. What is it like to edit Wikipedia when you’re blind? Meet Graham Pearce

    Graham Pearce has been a devoted Wikipedian for eleven years. He spends an average of six to eight hours a day onwiki on tasks that keep the site operating smoothly, such as merging page histories, repairing vandalism, and blocking miscreants—all in addition to article writing and editing.... Read more

  7. The one true international language is translation

    We may use English, but it’s not an international language that works everywhere for everyone.... Read more

  8. Spreading information in the Wikimedia world

    We need to work to be open for participation for those who want to participate—and in the Wikimedia movement, that requires a lot of translation.... Read more

  9. Wait, what? How a double-agent codenamed Zigzag two-timed everyone

    Eddie Chapman, a former safecracker, worked for both sides in World War II, and had three fiancées. He also may have saved London from many bombings. ... Read more

  10. Wikimedia community in Iraq partners with Asiacell to bring Wikipedia to nearly 12 million subscribers free of mobile data charges

    Community initiative inspires mobile partnership with Asiacell, one of Iraq’s largest mobile operators, to expand access to Wikipedia across Iraq.... Read more