Technology

  1. New monthly dataset shows where people fall into Wikipedia rabbit holes

    The Wikimedia Foundation’s Analytics team is releasing a monthly clickstream dataset. The dataset represents—in aggregate—how readers reach a Wikipedia article and navigate to the next. Previously published as a static release, this dataset is now available as a series of monthly data dumps for English, Russian, German, Spanish, and Japanese Wikipedias.... Read more

  2. “We keep the servers going … and much more”: Recent highlights from our Technology department

    Running the servers is only a fraction of the technical and community work that the Wikimedia Foundation’s Technology department does every day. Here’s who we are, along with a few snapshots of our work.... Read more

  3. Designing for offline on Android

    We’ve introduced a number of improvements to the Wikipedia Android app to better serve these app users who have restricted or low-bandwidth access to the internet. ... Read more

  4. A new platform to explore statistics about Wikimedia projects

    Meet Wikistats 2, a new public dashboard and dataset for metrics related to how people read and contribute to Wikimedia projects. ... Read more

  5. Seven translation tools you can use to work in multiple languages across Wikimedia projects

    Wikipedia is available in hundreds of languages, which is both a gift and a curse—the latter because so much of our knowledge is locked behind language barriers for too many people. Here are the tools Wikimedia has, to help translators bring the sum of all knowledge to their own communities.... Read more

  6. Gnomes and trolls and hobgoblins (oh my!)—Failed queries and the vicarious fear of missing out

    Many experienced Wikipedians have hit on the same clever idea to help less sophisticated users more easily find what they are looking for: take note of what they failed to find and leave a trail of breadcrumbs for the next newbie who comes along. But is there actually anything there? (Hint: Read about Betteridge’s law.)... Read more

  7. The journey to Thumbor, part 3: Development and deployment strategy

    Thumbor is an open source software service focused on resizing media into thumbnail images. Contributors upload full-size original media to Wikimedia projects, and those files need to be resized in order to keep their size reasonable for readers when included in articles. MediaWiki is capable of performing the same resizing tasks, but using Thumbor for the Wikimedia production environment is benef... Read more

  8. The journey to Thumbor, part 2: Thumbnailing architecture

    Thumbor is an open source software service focused on resizing media into thumbnail images. Contributors upload full-size original media to Wikimedia projects, and those files need to be resized in order to keep their size reasonable for readers when included in articles. MediaWiki is capable of performing the same resizing tasks, but using Thumbor for the Wikimedia production environment is benef... Read more

  9. The journey to Thumbor, part 1: Rationale

    Thumbor is an open source software service focused on resizing media into thumbnail images. Contributors upload full-size original media to Wikimedia projects, and those files need to be resized in order to keep their size reasonable for readers when included in articles. MediaWiki is capable of performing the same resizing tasks, but using Thumbor for the Wikimedia production environment is benef... Read more

  10. Think twice, code once: How Wikimedia shares common functionality across different projects

    An overview of a recent cross-team effort at Wikimedia to reuse code on a variety of different platforms and the continuing story of lazy loading... Read more