Research

  1. ‘Conversations gone awry’—the researchers figuring out when online conversations get out of hand

    Did you know that humans make the right guess about 72% of the time, and that indicates that they have an intuition for this task, while also highlighting that the task is far from trivial?... Read more

  2. What are the ten most cited sources on Wikipedia? Let’s ask the data.

    A new dataset of fifteen million records documents source usage in Wikipedia by identifier and across languages.... Read more

  3. The Initiative for Open Citations celebrates its first birthday

    In celebration, and to mark the progress made, we’ve designated this month as Open Citations Month.... Read more

  4. Why the world reads Wikipedia: What we learned about reader motivation from a recent research study

    Wikimedia’s mission is to provide educational content and to effectively disseminate it. Doing so requires understanding the needs and motivations of the people who read Wikipedia. In this blog post, we discuss what we learned about Wikipedia reader motivations and needs across 14 languages from a recent research study.... Read more

  5. Wikimedia Research Newsletter, February 2018

    Politically diverse editors write better articles; Reddit and Stack Overflow benefit from Wikipedia but don’t give back
    With contributions by: Barbara Page, FULBERT, Steve Jankowski and Tilman Bayer... Read more

  6. Wikimedia Research Newsletter, January 2018

    Automated Q&A from Wikipedia articles; Who succeeds in talk page discussions?
    With contributions by: Eddie891, Thomas Niebler, Barbara (WVS) and Tilman Bayer... Read more

  7. What galleries, libraries, archives, and museums can teach us about multimedia metadata on Wikimedia Commons

    Upcoming changes to Wikimedia Commons will make it easier to add, update, and find important information about individual files and entire collections. New research helps us understand what to improve, and why it matters.... Read more

  8. How we made that net neutrality clickstream diagram

    To illustrate our recent post on Wikipedia clickstream ‘rabbit holes,’ the Wikimedia Foundation’s Mikhail Popov used R code to create a net neutrality clickstream. An overview of core graph theory terms is provided, along with brief introductions to R packages igraph, ggplot2, and ggraph. While some familiarity with R is necessary, he includes a list of free resources for learnin... Read more

  9. New monthly dataset shows where people fall into Wikipedia rabbit holes

    The Wikimedia Foundation’s Analytics team is releasing a monthly clickstream dataset. The dataset represents—in aggregate—how readers reach a Wikipedia article and navigate to the next. Previously published as a static release, this dataset is now available as a series of monthly data dumps for English, Russian, German, Spanish, and Japanese Wikipedias.... Read more

  10. Wikimedia Research Newsletter, September 2017

    French medical articles have “high rate of veracity”; quality comparisons across languages; perceptions of credibility
    With contributions by: Nicolas Jullien, Leila Zia, Tilman Bayer and FULBERT... Read more