Jeff Elder

  1. What if people paid for Wikipedia, and only got a few articles? Now you can

    Millions of pages are available on Wikipedia and free to browse at any time, but what if people could pay for a download of Wikipedia?... Read more

  2. Wait, what? The fairies that fooled Arthur Conan Doyle

    One hundred years ago, two cousins took a camera down to a stream in northern England and came back with a controversy that lingered almost magically in the air for decades.... Read more

  3. How a feminist stood up to trolls and measurably changed Wikipedia’s coverage of women scientists

    Did the efforts of Emily Temple-Wood (“Keilana”) and other editors really make a difference in Wikipedia’s coverage of women scientists—especially given the vast expanse of an encyclopedia that has 5.4 million articles in English alone? The answer, one year after the headlines, is an unequivocal yes.... Read more

  4. Wait, what? How a double-agent codenamed Zigzag two-timed everyone

    Eddie Chapman, a former safecracker, worked for both sides in World War II, and had three fiancées. He also may have saved London from many bombings. ... Read more

  5. Winning photos in world’s largest photography contest reveal a world of monuments—and the volunteers who love them

    The top fifteen photos of Wiki Loves Monuments 2016 reveal a world of monuments, lovingly depicted by volunteers.... Read more

  6. How the world’s largest photo competition attracts a very human collection of heritage

    Wiki Loves Monuments drew 277,365 entries from 10,748 participants this year, the largest pool of submissions of any photo competition. Volunteers go through all of those, first on the national level, then for the global finals. The top 15 photos—winnowed all the way down from the more than a quarter-million—will be announced next week.... Read more

  7. The top fifteen phenomenal winning photos from Wiki Loves Earth

    115,000 images were submitted as part of Wiki Loves Earth this year.... Read more

  8. Vote Wikipedia for ad-free and neutral political information

    If you want to understand how and why red and blue maps of the United States are everywhere on Tuesday, November 8, this article has the whole history, ad-free.... Read more

  9. Drawing 100 heroic women in 100 days

    Rori, an artist in St. Louis, received a Facebook message from someone she doesn’t know a few weeks ago. The note urged her to draw a portrait of someone named Azucena Villaflor.... Read more

  10. Writing women into Wikipedia with the United Nations: the #HERstory editathons

    One editor published her first Wikipedia article at a Cairo #HERstory editathon. “I attended without having a clue about what should I do or how to write on Wikipedia,” she said. “I can’t wait to write more.”... Read more