Photo by BerryJ, CC BY-SA 4.0.

The Buddhist temple of Wat Arun has long been one of Thailand’s best-known landmarks. The photo above features the front entrance to its Ordination Hall, guarded by the demons Thotsakan (left) and Sahatsadecha (right). It was taken last year and uploaded to Wikimedia Commons during Wiki Loves Monuments, the world’s largest photo competition, winning fifth place out of all the submissions.

“I traveled to the temple by boat along the Chaopraya River,” the photographer Janepop Atirattanachai told us. “I waited three hours to take the photo at twilight, seeing a lot of travelers, a lot of smiles, and a lot of moments in that time.”

You too can experience the magic and help preserve and document cultural history for the future. Less than a week remains in the 2017 edition of Wiki Loves Monuments.

54 countries or regions from around the globe are participating this year, and the contest winners last year reflected its global scope: a district court in Berlin, a palace in Brazil, a concert hall in London, and a fort and castle in Pakistan and Slovakia (respectively).

The only requirements are that you upload the photo to Wikimedia Commons under a free licenses during the month of September.

You can learn more about participating on Wiki Loves Monument’s official website. In short, you need to:

  1. Make sure that the country or region that the monument is located in is participating in the contest;
  2. Upload your photo via the contest-specific process. (Photos can have been taken at any time; they only need have been uploaded during the month of September.)

Below, you’ll find some of the winners from last year. Join them this year by submitting your own photos.

royal_albert_hall_-_central_view_169

Second place in Wiki Loves Monuments 2016. Photo by Colin, CC BY-SA 4.0.

darawar_fort

Tenth place. Photo by Tahsin Shah, CC BY-SA 4.0.

cachticky_hrad_a_visnove

Thirteenth place. Photo by Vladimír Ruček, CC BY-SA 4.0.

rakotzbrucke

Fourteenth place. Photo by Albrecht Landgraf, CC BY-SA 4.0.

Ed Erhart, Editorial Associate
Wikimedia Foundation