Wikipedia

See story for photo credits.

News on Wikipedia: Stock markets plunge, train attack thwarted, and more

Find out how Wikipedia is covering this week’s current news events: A Hawker Hunter jet crashes into a busy road in Shropshire, England, killing at least 11 people on the ground; Jihadist group Islamic State demolishes the ancient Syrian Temple of Baalshamin; Global markets seesaw violently in the wake of a Chinese stock market crash; The ongoing Okanogan Complex fire becomes the largest wildfire in Washington state history; Passengers on an international Thalys train subdue a gunman, preventing an apparent terrorism attack.

Read more
Photo by Jasanpictures, freely licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

As Odia Wikipedia turns 13, what happens next?

Odia Wikipedia (or.wikipedia.org) celebrated its 13th anniversary on June 3. Instead of just celebrating the day, the community brainstormed together on needs assessment, learning from past and strategies for future.

Read more
Photo by Thomas Nitz/Open Knowledge Foundation Deutschland, freely licensed under CC BY 2.0.

When cultural heritage gets a digital life

An additional 600,000 free files are now available on the Wikimedia Commons, ranging from century-old films to recordings of mechanical pianos, World War II photographs, scans of dried flowers, and other art and heritage, all sourced from German museums, archives, and libraries.

Read more
See story for photo credits.

News on Wikipedia: Explosions in China, Brazilian protests, and more

Find out how Wikipedia is covering this week’s current news events: A bomb blast near a shrine in central Bangkok kills 23 people; Protesters in more than 200 Brazilian cities demand the resignation of Dilma Rouseff; A series of massive explosions in Tianjin, China, kill more than 114 people; American golfer Jordan Spieth becomes world number one, while Australian Jason Day wins the 2015 PGA Championship; A domestic plane carring 54 people crashes in Indonesia, killing all on board.

Read more
Iceberg_Ilulissat_lead

Despite headlines, frequent edits don’t cause inaccuracy

Wikipedia is the encyclopedia anyone can edit. It didn’t surprise us to learn that articles considered to be controversial are frequently edited.

Read more
Photo by Kai Mörk, freely licensed under CC BY 3.0 (Germany).

How Wikipedia responds to breaking news

Wikipedia often deals with breaking news that is developed and expanded rapidly by its community of volunteer editors. 607 Journalists is a thesis that looks deeper into this development, investigating the speed of development, verifiability of article text, and the range of contributors to the article overall.

Read more
Photograph by Chamal N, public domain.

When countries disappear

A plethora of countries have disappeared into the annals of history. Wikipedia has a project that covers them.

Read more
Content Translation session at Wikimania 2015. Photo by Amire80, freely licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

Content Translation updates from Wikimania 2015

Many participants were introduced to Content Translation at Wikimania, Mexico and they created their first articles using the tool at the translation sessions.

Read more
See story for photo credits.

Wikimedia Highlights, July 2015

Here are highlights from across the Wikimedia movement, as reported on this blog in July 2015: Konkani Wikipedia goes live; Leigh Thelmadatter is involved in the changes she wants to see; Wikidata, coming soon to a menu near you; Wikimedians urge the EU to protect freedom of panorama; ACLU files amended complaint on behalf of the Wikimedia Foundation; Get the latest Wikipedia updates easily with IFTTT.

Read more
See story for photo credits.

News on Wikipedia: Google reshuffles into Alphabet, Japan remembers, and more

Find out how Wikipedia is covering this week’s current news events: Google announces plans to reorganise under umbrella company Alphabet; Japan commemorates 70 years since the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; The New Suez Canal opens in Egypt after a year’s development; Typhoon Soudelor makes landfall, killing at least 29 people; North Korea moves clocks permanently back half an hour.

Read more