Wikimedia blog

News from the Wikimedia Foundation and about the Wikimedia movement

Posts by Tilman Bayer

Sue Gardner to receive first Knight Innovation Award

Wikimedia Foundation Executive Director Sue Gardner

The Wikimedia Foundation is delighted to share the news that Sue Gardner will receive the first Knight Innovation Award from the Knight Foundation, in conjunction with City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism and its Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism.

“Sue’s extraordinary vision for Internet freedom and openness has helped guide the rapidly changing world of journalism into the digital age,” said Michael Maness, Knight Foundation vice president of journalism and media innovation. “Her outstanding accomplishments, first as a journalist and then as leader of the Wikimedia Foundation, have set a firm footing for the future of media.”

Sue began her career at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. After her time as a reporter, journalist and producer, she became the Executive Director of the Wikimedia Foundation in 2007, utilizing her insight while overseeing a period of extraordinary growth both in the readership of Wikipedia – now the fifth most visited website in the world – and in donations made to the Wikimedia Foundation. In recognition of her bold international leadership in media and universal Internet access, Sue will receive a $25,000 award and will grant another $25,000 to a startup of her choice in support of innovation and entrepreneurship in news and information.

Jeff Jarvis, director of the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism, said, “We are committed to supporting new models for sustainable journalism and to incorporating technology developments as our industry transforms. Sue’s work clearly demonstrates her alignment with these goals. We are delighted to honor her for her brave and creative actions and accomplishments.”

The Wikimedia Foundation would like to thank Knight Foundation for publicly recognizing Sue’s leadership and dedication throughout her career. Sue is set to receive her award and speak on innovation today, Dec. 16, at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

Tilman Bayer
Movement Communications

Wikimedia Highlights, November 2013

Information For versions in other languages, please check the wiki version of this report, or add your own translation there!

Highlights from the Wikimedia Foundation Report and the Wikimedia engineering report for November 2013, with a selection of other important events from the Wikimedia movement

Wikimedia Foundation highlights

Duration of edit-a-thons: 91% lasted less than 8 hours

New support material for program organizers: Evaluation report about edit-a-thons, and a pattern library

A new report about edit-a-thons includes data from 46 events between February 2012 and October 2013. It starts a series of seven reports about the most common types of programs executed by Wikimedia program leaders around the world, authored by the Wikimedia Foundation’s Program Evaluation and Design team. This is the first time that such an analysis compares the outcomes of a specific program to its costs. Among the many findings of this report is that edit-a-thons with a small budget can be as productive as events with a large budget.

In the new learning pattern library on Meta, Wikimedians can share what they learn about organizing activities like edit-a-thons, GLAM collaborations, gender gap outreach, or Wiki Loves Monuments. Each pattern includes a description of a common problem, and instructions for solving it.

Screenshot of the new Beta Features preferences page

“Beta Features” option allows users to test upcoming software changes

A new “Beta Features” section has been added to the user preferences menu, allowing logged-in editors to test upcoming software changes and give feedback to the developers, before these features become available for everyone.

Open Source Language Summit in Pune, India

Together with Red Hat, the Wikimedia Foundation’s language engineering team organized the fall 2013 Open Source Language Summit in Pune, India. It was also attended by members of the VisualEditor and Mobile teams. Session topics included:

  • improving the support for fonts (in particular in Indic languages)
  • input methods for entering characters that are not available on a user’s keyboard
  • the Language Coverage Matrix Dashboard, which displays how a language is supported on Wikimedia projects
  • a prototype for a user interface for translating Wikipedia articles and other content

OAuth extension makes it easier to use third-party editing tools

All Wikimedia wikis now support OAuth, an open standard that allows users to authorize third-party software tools to carry out actions on the wiki on their behalf, without handing over their user password. Among the first tools that use this new feature is “CropTool“, which allows users to crop images on Wikimedia Commons.

  • A visualization of the interaction between a third-party tool (left), the wiki and the user under the OAuth protocol
  • OAuth-metrics-20131107.pdf
  • OAuth-metrics-20131107.pdf
  • OAuth-metrics-20131107.pdf

Data and Trends

Global unique visitors for October:

530 million (+4.86% compared with September; +8.62% compared with the previous year)
(comScore data for all Wikimedia Foundation projects; comScore will release November data later in December)

(more…)

Wikimedia Foundation Report, November 2013

Information You are more than welcome to edit the wiki version of this report for the purposes of usefulness, presentation, etc., and to add translations of the “Highlights” excerpts.

Contents

Data and Trends

Global unique visitors for October:

530 million (+4.86% compared with September; +8.62% compared with the previous year)
(comScore data for all Wikimedia Foundation projects; comScore will release November data later in December)

Page requests for November:

19.039 billion (+1.2% compared with October; -6.4% compared with the previous year)
(Server log data, all Wikimedia Foundation projects including mobile access. Note: the numbers previously reported for the months of July to October 2013 have been corrected.)

Active Registered Editors for October 2013 (>= 5 mainspace edits/month, excluding bots):

75,964 (-0.99% compared with September / -3.83% compared with the previous year)
(Database data, all Wikimedia Foundation projects.)

Report Card (integrating various statistical data and trends about WMF projects):

http://reportcard.wmflabs.org/

(Definitions)

Financials

Wikimedia Foundation YTD Revenue and Expenses vs Plan as of October 31, 2013

Wikimedia Foundation YTD Expenses by Functions as of October 31, 2013

(Financial information is only available through October 2013 at the time of this report.)

All financial information presented is for the Month-To-Date and Year-To-Date October 31, 2013.

Revenue $11,646,366
Expenses:
Engineering Group $5,379,535
Fundraising Group $1,097,830
Grantmaking Group $556,471
Programs Group $573,291
Grants $857,473
Governance Group $221,061
Legal/Community Advocacy/Communications Group $1,058,063
Finance/HR/Admin Group $2,490,383
Total Expenses $12,234,107
Total deficit ($587,741)
  • Revenue for the month of October is $3.78MM versus plan of $4.91MM, approximately $1.13MM or 23% under plan.
  • Year-to-date revenue is $11.65MM versus plan of $7.88MM, approximately $3.77MM or 48% over plan.
  • Expenses for the month of October is $2.84MM versus plan of $3.52MM, approximately $680K or 19% under plan, primarily due to lower personnel expenses, capital expenses, internet hosting, legal fees, payment processing fees, and travel expenses partially offset by higher grants and recruiting expenses.
  • Year-to-date expenses is $12.23MM versus plan of $14.70MM, approximately $2.47MM or 17% under plan, primarily due to lower personnel expenses, capital expenses, internet hosting, legal fees, grants, staff development expenses, and travel expenses partially offset by higher payment processing fees.
  • Cash position is $38.61MM as of October 31, 2013.

Highlights

Duration of edit-a-thons: 91% lasted less than 8 hours

New support material for program organizers: Evaluation report about edit-a-thons, and a pattern library

(more…)

Wikimedia Research Newsletter, November 2013

Wikimedia Research Newsletter
Wikimedia Research Newsletter Logo.png


Vol: 3 • Issue: 11 • November 2013 [contribute] [archives] Syndicate the Wikimedia Research Newsletter feed

Reciprocity and reputation motivate contributions to Wikipedia; indigenous knowledge and “cultural imperialism”; how PR people see Wikipedia

With contributions by: Piotr Konieczny, Brian Keegan, Nicolas Jullien, Amir E. Aharoni, Henrique Andrade, Tilman Bayer, Daniel Mietchen, Giovanni Luca Ciampaglia, Dario Taraborelli and Aaron Halfaker

What drives people to contribute to Wikipedia? Experiment suggests reciprocity and social image motivations

Wikipedia works on the efforts of unpaid volunteers who choose to donate their time to advance the cause of free knowledge. This phenomenon, as trivial as it may sound to those acquainted with Wikipedia inner workings, has always puzzled economists and social scientists alike, in that standard Economic theory would not predict that such enterprises (and any other community of peer production, for example open source software) would thrive without any form of remuneration. The flip-side of direct remuneration — passion, enthusiasm, belief in free knowledge, in short, intrinsic motivations — could not alone (at least as standard theory goes) convincingly explain such prolonged efforts, given essentially away for free.

Early on the dawn of the Open Source/Libre software movement, some economists noted that successfully contributing to high-profile projects like Linux or Apache may translate in a strong résumé for a software developer, and proposed, as a way to reconcile traditional economic theory with reality, that whereas other forms of extrinsic motivation are available, sustained contribution to a peer production system could happen. But what about Wikipedia? The career incentive is largely absent in the case of the Free Encyclopedia, and is it really the case that intrinsic motivation such as pure altruism cannot be really behind the prolonged efforts of its contributors?

To understand this, a group of researchers at Sciences Po, Harvard Law School, and University of Strasbourg (among others) designed a series of online experiments with the intent of measuring social preferences, and administered them to a group of volunteer Wikipedia editors to understand whether contribution to Wikipedia can be explained by any of the main hypotheses that economists have thus far formulated regarding contribution to public goods.[1][2] The researchers considered three hypotheses, two for intrinsic and one for extrinsic forms of motivation: pure altruism, reciprocity, and social image motives.

In more detail, the researchers asked a number of Wikipedia editors and contributors (all with a registered account) to participate in a series of experimental games specifically designed to measure the extent to which people behave according to one or more of the above social preferences — for example by either free-riding or contributing to the common pool in a public goods game. In addition to this, as a proxy measure for the “social image” hypothesis, they checked whether participants ever received a barnstar on their talk pages and whether they ever chose to display any of these on their user page (coding these individuals as “social signallers”). Finally, they matched each participant with their history of contribution of the participants, and sought to understand which of these measures can explain their edit counts.

The results suggest that reciprocity seems to be the driver of contribution for less experienced editors, whereas reputation (social image) seems to better explain the activity of the more seasoned editors, though, as the authors acknowledge, the goodness of fit of the regression estimates is not great. The study was at the center of a heated debate within the community about the usage of site-wide banners for recruitment purposes. On December 3, one of the authors gave a presentation about the results at Harvard, which is available online as an audio and video recording. According to the Harvard Crimson, he remarked “that the study is still in progress and more data needs to be collected”. The results are so far available in the form of a conference paper and as an unpublished working paper.

Does “cultural imperialism” prevent the incorporation of indigenous knowledge on Wikipedia?

(more…)

Wikimedia Highlights, October 2013

Information For versions in other languages, please check the wiki version of this report, or add your own translation there!

Highlights from the Wikimedia Foundation Report and the Wikimedia engineering report for October 2013, with a selection of other important events from the Wikimedia movement

Wikimedia Foundation highlights

Pilot project for free mobile access to Wikipedia via text messages in Kenya

Wikipedia Zero, the program to provide access to Wikipedia on mobile phones free of data charges, became available in Kenya this month. The partnership with mobile provider Airtel also involves a pilot project testing free access to Wikipedia via USSD/SMS. For the first time, this service enables people who cannot afford data-enabled smartphones to read Wikipedia through SMS on low-cost basic phones (“feature phones“).

An open letter for free access to Wikipedia

Video about South African students’ grassroot efforts to get Wikipedia free on their cellphones

In November 2012, the students of Sinenjongo High School, South Africa wrote an open letter on Facebook, encouraging cellphone carriers to waive data charges for accessing Wikipedia, so they can do their homework. Victor Grigas and filmmaker Charlene Music visited them and asked them to read their open letter on camera, resulting in a short video that was published this October. Help is welcome with the translation, design and promotion of this video and of the longer documentary that will be published about the students’ call for the carriers to sign up to the Wikipedia Zero partnership program organized by the Wikimedia Foundation.

Planning the replacement of the Florida data center

The Wikimedia Foundation’s Technical Operations team published a detailed request for proposals (RfP), inviting offers for the location of a new data center in the United States. It will join the existing primary data center in Virginia, and replace the data center in Tampa, Florida. Wikipedia and its sister projects have been hosted in Florida since 2004.

Data and Trends

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Wikimedia Foundation Report, October 2013

Information You are more than welcome to edit the wiki version of this report for the purposes of usefulness, presentation, etc., and to add translations of the “Highlights” excerpts.

Contents

Data and Trends

Dario Taraborelli presenting an analysis of trends in active editor numbers

Global unique visitors for September:

506 million (+1.82% compared with August; +6.54% compared with the previous year)
(comScore data for all Wikimedia Foundation projects; comScore will release October data later in November)

Page requests for October:

27.05 billion (+4.4% compared with September; +36.6% compared with the previous year)
(Server log data, all Wikimedia Foundation projects including mobile access)

Active Registered Editors for September 2013 (>= 5 mainspace edits/month, excluding bots):

76,959 (+0.76% compared with August / -5.83% compared with the previous year)
(Database data, all Wikimedia Foundation projects.)

Report Card (integrating various statistical data and trends about WMF projects):

http://reportcard.wmflabs.org/

(Definitions)

Financials

Wikimedia Foundation YTD Revenue and Expenses vs Plan as of September 30, 2013

Wikimedia Foundation YTD Expenses by Functions as of September 30, 2013

(more…)

Wikimedia Research Newsletter, October 2013

Wikimedia Research Newsletter
Wikimedia Research Newsletter Logo.png


Vol: 3 • Issue: 10 • October 2013 [contribute] [archives] Syndicate the Wikimedia Research Newsletter feed

User influence on site policies: Wikipedia vs. Facebook vs. YouTube

With contributions by: Han-Teng Liao, Piotr Konieczny, Taha Yasseri, and Tilman Bayer

User influence on site policies is highest on Wikipedia, compared to YouTube and Facebook

Laura Stein, a researcher at the University of Texas at Austin, has concluded[1] that, based on her comparison of user policy documents (including the Terms of Service) of YouTube, Facebook and Wikipedia, Wikipedia offers the highest level of participation power overall. Using Arnstein’s ladder of participation to begin a theoretical discussion on participation and power, Stein carefully proposed a typology of policy and participation (Table 1, p. 359), from the maximal power of “dominant control over site content and governance”, “shared control”, the minimal power of “consultation”, “choice”, and “informing”, to the no power of “deceptive or inadequate information” and “nonparticipation”. She applied this typology across the five policy areas: “permitted content and its use”, “content ownership/copyrights”, “user information/data”, “modifying software” and “user policy formation & consent”) for the three websites, and found that Wikipedia beats other websites in all areas. In the first and last policy areas of “permitted content and its use” and “user policy formation & consent”, Wikipedia gives users the “dominant control” of participation power; for the remaining areas, Wikipedia gives user “shared control over site content and governance”.

In contrast, YouTube and Facebook only provide the minimal power of “informing” in three policy areas: “permitted content and its use”, “content ownership/copyrights”, “modifying software” and provide slightly better minimal power of “choice” for the “user information/data area”. Although Wikipedia is not widely agreed on to be a “social media” website, Stein nevertheless presented a simple typology for evaluating the levels of participation power given to users by platforms. Also, it would be useful to apply this topology in other policy areas including fund dissemination and organizational governance in the near future.

Wikipedia’s coverage of academics

Histogram of h-indexes of scientists from four different disciplines featured in Wikipedia. The solid line shows the average considering all the researchers of the field.

Anna Samoilenko and Taha Yasseri from the Oxford Internet Institute released an arXiv preprint titled: “The distorted mirror of Wikipedia: a quantitative analysis of Wikipedia coverage of academics”.[2] In this study the notability of academics in the English Wikipedia is examined. The ground truth is taken to be the citation records of the scholars under study and the h-index in particular, although the authors admit that the quantity of publications and citations are not the best proxies for evaluating the quality and scientific impact of researchers. Based on the results of the paper, scientists covered in Wikipedia (which are taken from a sample of 400 scientists in 4 different fields of physics, computer science, biology and psychology) (more…)

Wikimedia Highlights, September 2013

Information For versions in other languages, please check the wiki version of this report, or add your own translation there!

Highlights from the Wikimedia Foundation Report and the Wikimedia engineering report for September 2013, with a selection of other important events from the Wikimedia movement

Wikimedia Foundation highlights

Siko Bouterse presenting about Individual Engagement Grants (at the Foundation’s October 3 metrics and activities meeting)

22 proposals for Individual Engagement Grants submitted

The Foundation’s Individual Engagement Grants support individuals or small teams working on projects that help Wikimedia’s volunteers do their work. The program was started in early 2013 and its second round of proposals closed on September 30. 22 complete proposals were submitted, totaling $297,575 in requested funding. The requested sums range from $10 to $30,000. Via online community organizing, offline outreach, tool-building and research, the proposals aim to impact at least 15 different Wikimedia projects. Examples include a project for “Reimagining Mentorship on Wikipedia” and work on ensuring that gadgets that support editing are updated to be compatible with the new VisualEditor. In October, proposals are being checked for eligibility while community discussion continues, before the committee’s formal review begins on 23 October.

FDC receives 11 proposals for annual plan grants, looks back on first year of operation

The Funds Dissemination Committee (FDC) process is another component of WMF grantmaking, where organizations in the Wikimedia movement can request larger grants to support their annual plans. This committee, which reviews the requests and makes recommendations to the Board of Trustees consists, entirely of volunteers, supported by WMF staff. The second FDC round of 2013 was concluding in September, with 11 Wikimedia organizations requesting a total of almost 6 million US dollars. Until October 31, Wikimedians are invited to participate in the community review period of the proposals

FDC staff also worked on preparing the 2012-2013 annual report looking back at the first year of operation since the FDC was established in 2012. It includes reflections from WMF Executive Director Sue Gardner about the FDC process.

Community consultation about new privacy policy begins

The Foundation’s Legal and Community Advocacy team announced the launch of the 4.5 month-long community consultation and feedback period (scheduled to conclude on 15 January 2014) for the new privacy policy draft. Feedback and discussion has been very fruitful thus far and have already helped improve the draft.

Data and Trends

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Wikimedia Foundation Report, September 2013

Information You are more than welcome to edit the wiki version of this report for the purposes of usefulness, presentation, etc., and to add translations of the “Highlights” excerpts.

Data and Trends

Global unique visitors for August:

497 million (+0.97% compared with July; +8.90% compared with the previous year)
(comScore data for all Wikimedia Foundation projects; comScore will release September data later in October)

Page requests for September:

25.90 billion (+8.6% compared with August; +30.8% compared with the previous year)
(Server log data, all Wikimedia Foundation projects including mobile access)

Active Registered Editors for August 2013 (>= 5 mainspace edits/month, excluding bots):

76,612 (-0.34% compared with July / -2.94% compared with the previous year)
(Database data, all Wikimedia Foundation projects.)

Report Card (integrating various statistical data and trends about WMF projects):

http://reportcard.wmflabs.org/

(Definitions)

Financials

Wikimedia Foundation YTD Revenue and Expenses vs Plan as of August 31, 2013

Wikimedia Foundation YTD Expenses by Functions as of August 31, 2013

(Financial information is only available through August 2013 at the time of this report.)

All financial information presented is for the Month-To-Date and Year-To-Date August 31, 2013.

Revenue $5,408,836
Expenses:
Engineering Group $2,515,199
Fundraiser Group $573,336
Grantmaking & Programs Group $607,306
Grants $502,420
Governance Group $130,722
Legal/Community Advocacy/Communications Group $533,787
Finance/HR/Admin Group $1,201,542
Total Expenses $6,064,312
Total (loss) ($655,476)

Revenue for the month of August is $2.29MM versus plan of $0.99MM, approximately $1.3MM or 133% over plan.

Year-to-date revenue is $5.41MM versus plan of $1.99MM, approximately $3.42MM or 172% over plan.

Expenses for the month of August is $3.34MM versus plan of $4.26MM, approximately $919K or 25% under plan, primarily due to lower personnel expenses, capital expenses, internet hosting, legal fees, grants, and travel expenses partially offset by higher payment processing fees.

Year-to-date expenses is $6.06MM versus plan of $7.69MM, approximately $1.63MM or 21% under plan, primarily due to lower personnel expenses, capital expenses, internet hosting, legal fees, grants, and travel expenses partially offset by higher payment processing fees.

Cash position is $38.75MM as of August 31, 2013.

Highlights

Siko Bouterse presenting about Individual Engagement Grants (at the Foundation’s October 3 metrics and activities meeting)

22 proposals for Individual Engagement Grants submitted

The Foundation’s Individual Engagement Grants support individuals or small teams working on projects that help Wikimedia’s volunteers do their work. The program was started in early 2013 and its second round of proposals closed on September 30. 22 complete proposals were submitted, totaling $297,575 in requested funding. The requested sums range from $10 to $30,000. Via online community organizing, offline outreach, tool-building and research, the proposals aim to impact at least 15 different Wikimedia projects. Examples include (more…)

Wikimedia Highlights, August 2013

Information For versions in other languages, please check the wiki version of this report, or add your own translation there!

Highlights from the Wikimedia Foundation Report and the Wikimedia engineering report for August 2013, with a selection of other important events from the Wikimedia movement

Wikimedia Foundation highlights

Foundation staff report on their work at Wikimania

From August 7 to August 11, Wikimedians from around the world came together in Hong Kong for this year’s annual Wikimania conference, organized by Wikimedia Hong Kong in partnership with the Wikimedia Foundation and Wikimedia Switzerland (see also this month’s movement highlights). The keynote of Wikimedia Foundation Executive Director Sue Gardner was titled “The Year in Review and the Year Ahead” (slides, video), and the schedule included many other presentations by WMF staff and contractors:

WMF Executive Director Sue Gardner presenting her Wikimania keynote

  • Steven Walling, Siebrand Mazeland, Diederik van Liere, Maryana Pinchuk, Howie Fung, Fabrice Florin, James Forrester (with Denny Vrandečić): “What is a product manager, and why does Wikimedia need them?” (abstract, slides)
  • Philippe Beaudette: “Working together, but separately: a gathering of functionaries” (workshop; abstract)
  • Arthur Richards; Siebrand Mazeland; James Forrester; Diederik van Liere: “Hacking our teams: Flexible ‘agile’ development at the WMF” (panel; abstract, slides)
  • Tilman Bayer: “Editor surveys: Taking the pulse of the community” (abstract, slides)
  • Siebrand Mazeland and others: “Ask the developers” (abstract)
  • Santhosh Thottingal, Niklas Laxström: “MediaWiki i18n getting data-driven and world-reusable” (abstract, slides)
  • Niklas Laxström, Amir Aharoni: “Multilingual Wikimedia Commons – What can we do about it?” (abstract)
  • Sumana Harihareswara, Guillaume Paumier, Quim Gil, Andre Klapper: “Transparency and collaboration in Wikimedia engineering” (abstract, notes)
  • Dario Taraborelli (submitted with Ryan Faulkner): “The UserMetrics API: Measuring participation in Wikimedia projects” (abstract, slides)
  • James Forrester, Roan Kattouw, Ed Sanders, Timo Tijhof (with Inez Korczyński): “VisualEditor: The present and future of editing wikis” (abstract, slides, extended slides, video)
  • Siko Bouterse, Heather Walls (with Jake Orlowitz): “Fun user experience is SRS BZNSS, and so can you” (abstract, slides)
  • Katy Love, Anasuya Sengupta (with FDC members): “Nobody knows, but everyone cares: How to submit an awesome application to the Funds Dissemination Committee” (panel and round-table discussion; abstract)
  • Asaf Bartov: “WMF’s New Global South Strategy” (abstract, slides)
  • Diederik van Liere, Dario Taraborelli: “Datafying Wikimedia: Data products and services to empower our communities” (abstract)
  • Brandon Harris: “Flow: The future of collaboration” (abstract, slides)
  • Maryana Pinchuk: “Roundtable on Messaging and Discussions” (abstract, slides)
  • Jessie Wild (with Martin Rulsch): “Wikimania scholarships” (discussion; abstract)
  • Geoff Brigham, with the WMF legal team: “Discussing Our Legal Strategy Going Forward: A Talk with the WMF General Counsel” (abstract)
  • Luis Villa, Stephen LaPorte: “Licensing Trends in Open Culture, Open Data, and Open Source” (abstract, slides)
  • Pau Giner: “Improving the user experience of language tools” (abstract, slides)
  • James Forrester: “Improving ‘admin tools’” – workshop (abstract)
  • Matthew Roth, Victor Grigas, Tilman Bayer (with Eddie Erhart): “Wikimedia storytelling: how we show the movement to the world” (panel; abstract)
  • Steven Walling and others from the E3 team: “Forget the tutorials, be bold! How one feature has attracted thousands of new editors” (abstract, slides)
  • Fabrice Florin: “Notifications: A new editor engagement tool” (abstract, slides)
  • Ryan Kaldari, Benny Situ: “How to enhance your MediaWiki extensions with Echo notifications” (abstract)
  • Marc-André Pelletier: “Presenting the Tool Labs” (abstract)
  • Erik Moeller: “Ghosts of Wikis Yet to Come: Three Stories of Wikimedia’s Future” (abstract)
  • Jon Robson, Maryana Pinchuk: “Wikipedia Mobile – The Trojan Horse. Why MediaWiki has a separate mobile site” (abstract)
  • Fabrice Florin: “Engaging users on Wikipedia” (abstract, slides)
  • Matthew Flaschen and the E3 team: “Make your user experience easy to learn: a guided tour” (abstract, slides)
  • Andre Klapper: “Improving MediaWiki quality: How everybody can help with bug report triaging” (abstract, slides)
  • Fabrice Florin: “Article Feedback: New forms of collaboration between readers and editors” (abstract, slides)
  • LiAnna Davis (with Mohammed Ouda and Aya Mahfouz): “Growing the Arabic Wikipedia through the Wikipedia Education Program” (abstract, slides)
  • Howie Fung: “A look into next year: WMF Product Roadmap” (abstract)

Pre-conference:

  • Various WMF Engineering staff took part in the Wikimania DevCamp (hacking days)
  • Rod Dunican, LiAnna Davis, Sophie Österberg, Frank Schulenburg: Various sessions at the Education Program Pre-Conference
  • Siko Bouterse, Heather Walls: “IdeaLab Brainstorm” (workshop; abstract)
  • Fabrice Florin, Rob Lanphier, Erik Moeller, Ryan Kaldari (with Andrew Lih): “Multimedia Roundtable” (abstract, slides)

Beyond these, Wikimedia Foundation staff and contractors also participated in various other panels and workshops, and gave lightning talks.

Students contributions to the Arabic Wikipedia, 2012-13

Wikipedia Education Program in the Arab World completes its third term

The third term of the Wikipedia Education Program in the Arab World ended with strong results. The program began with a small pilot project at two universities in Egypt in spring 2012. It has now turned into a force on the Arabic Wikipedia, with students participating in the program in three countries, adding content to Wikipedia as part of their university coursework. Last term, students in Egypt, Algeria, and Jordan contributed 12.79 million bytes of content to the Arabic Wikipedia. That’s more than double the 5.97 million bytes of the fall 2012 term.

HTTPS by default for logged-in users

Following concerns over the privacy and security of Wikimedia users due to recent revelations about surveillance on the Internet, on August 28 the Foundation made changes so that now all logged-in users are, by default, accessing Wikimedia sites over an encrypted (HTTPS) connection. Users can turn this off in their preferences. More information can be found on Meta-wiki, in various languages.

Data and Trends

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