Happy Ada Lovelace Day!

Happy Ada Lovelace Day!

Ada Lovelace Day celebrates the legacy and life of Ada Lovelace (10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852), who is considered to be the first computer programmer in the world. This day also celebrates women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields (STEM).

Amazing events and activities are happening around the world, including among Wikipedia contributors. Today two editing events took place that aimed to increase content about women in science on Wikipedia, one at Solidaritetshuset in Stockholm, Sweden, and another at Harvard University. Tonight, in San Francisco, we’ll celebrate with a party hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, the Mozilla Foundation, and the Ada Initiative, a non-profit named after the Countless of Lovelace that supports women in open technology and cultural fields

Friday, there are two more important international events. Wikimedia UK is coordinating an edit-a-thon focused on women in science, which will be hosted at The Royal Society of London. In India, Wikipedia editors are organizing an online event where participants will focus their editing on Indian women scientists. We’ll be sure to share successes and stories from these events in the upcoming weeks.

Is there a woman in the tech world that you find inspiring? How are you celebrating the legacy of Ada Lovelace this week? Let us know in the comments.

Sarah Stierch, Community Fellow

Categories: Events, Outreach, WikiWomen
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2 Comments on Happy Ada Lovelace Day!

staceydfla 2 years

I read recently that women who pitch Silicon Valley venture capitalists take home 75 percent less investment capital than men. Publishing the contributions of women entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and inventors is a great place to start to changing this paradigm.

Amanda Burton 2 years

In 1969 when my mother, Norma King Jensen, turned 60 and was newly divorced and living on extremely limited means, she enrolled in local community college to follow her passion and ultimately to become a sought-after Sr. Systems Analyst in the burgeoning data processing industry. She worked in-house and as a contractor for major companies until well into her 70’s, retiring only when her health began to decline. This was especially meaningful because, although she received her Masters degree in Mining Engineering and went to work as a research metallurgist supporting the war effort in 1942, when the war was over she was offered only secretarial work at the many engineering firms to which she applied. Finally to achieve secure professional work in one’s 60’s is still remarkable today; in fact I think it may be even less likely in today’s youth-oriented culture. Her achievement reminds us of the importance of governmental support for education at every level, and should underscore public alarm about shrinking resources at community and state colleges.

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